On A Tangent

The ultimate site for a generation sidetracked by the fandom life


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2017: The Year of Recognition

The other day on Facebook, my work friend Sara tagged me in this fun little activity where a bunch of words fly through a video, you take a screenshot, and the word you land on is what you will “manifest” in 2017. I’m SO not an astrology kind of girl, but I admit, I love finding the deeper meaning in fun things like that, so I took a screenshot.

According to “Astrology and Angel Mediums,” I will manifest “Recognition” in 2017.

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My first thought was “how the heck do you ‘manifest recognition’?!” It sounds like some New Age mantra that you’d chant at a sweat lodge. (Which would actually probably be right up my INFJ alley… but I digress.)

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Who Says You Can’t Go Home? Recapping Gilmore Girls: A Year in the Life

First of all, if you haven’t watched the Gilmore Girls: A Year In the Life revival on Netflix yet, please stop right here and go binge for about 6 hours like the rest of us.

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The Gilmore Girls fandom, both before and after watching GG: AYITL this past week.

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Beginning In Media Res, Origin Fatigue, and Worldbuilding; or, Fantastic Ideas and How to Lose Them

This piece contains spoilers for Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them. 

This weekend, after some house cleaning and the chaos of Thanksgiving, my mom and I went to the movies. We both wanted to see Moana and Fantastic Beasts and Where to Find Them, so we settled on a double feature: Fantastic Beasts first, then dinner, and Moana for dessert.

Over dinner, we discussed the first movie. We both liked it, we agreed. We thought the visual effects were (pun intended) fantastic, the creatures were fascinating, and that Eddie Redmayne was a great choice for the lead.

But as we discussed, a thought occurred to me. I turned to my mom with a question.

“Did you understand who Grindelwald was?”

Her answer, of course, was no. My mom has seen the movies, but she never read the books. Though she might have remembered his brief appearance in the final films, he wasn’t really highlighted. For her, Grindelwald was just a name on a newspaper. The significance of his presence in the film was lost to her entirely. fb

Fantastic Beasts is a movie produced under strange, but increasingly common circumstances. Harry Potter is a global phenomenon — you’d be hard pressed to find someone of my generation who hasn’t read or at least watched it. It sparked films, LEGOs, theme parks, and the ever-expanding Pottermore, for those who just can’t get enough of the world. Fantastic Beasts is a product of that multimedia empire and ravenous fanbase, always clamoring for more — it’s a story already sketched out in vague lines for devoted fans who picked up the “textbook” on which it is based.

But the film fleshes that story out. And as a part of a multimedia franchise, it does so in a manner that assumes many things about what its audience knows about the setting. If Fantastic Beasts were merely a sequel, that might be okay. There is an expectation with sequels that you really only get the full picture if you’ve followed the series (although skilled writers should be able to ground you in the story regardless.)

But Fantastic Beasts isn’t a sequel, as such. It’s the beginning of a new series, one that, while related to Harry Potter tangentially, exists entirely on its own plot and characters. It is our entry into a world familiar, yet strange.

But if this is our entry point… boy, is it muddled.

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5 Things by the Time I’m 30

The countdown is officially on. I’m nearing the big 3-0. It’s an exciting and fun time of life. My husband and I are happily secure enough to get to do some travel. We live close enough to 90% of our family to see them on a weekly or monthly basis. We have a fabulous group of friends who, although they live literally across the globe, make it a point to stay close utilizing technology.

True, we’ve been handed some really rough lemons over the years, but we have always chosen to turn them into SourPatch Kids. The 30s are going to be our best decade.

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Jay Gatsby agrees. His 20s sucked too.

To be fair, I would seriously contemplate bodily harm on anyone who tried to send me back to the start of my 20s. People say they’d “give anything to be 20 again.” I don’t think they know what this term means.

What is fun about being poor, lonely and uncertain about your direction in life, feeling like the whole world must understand this better than you? (It’s possible that this is not everyone’s 20s experience. I hear there was parties and drinking for some.)

That being said, transitioning from your third decade of life into your fourth should be met with a certain pizazz. So I queried the world. What should I do while I was still “living it up” in my 20s? Continue reading


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Tapping on the Fourth Wall: Do They Know They’re Singing?

Musical theater is a divisive medium. For some, it produces endless delight and fanatical devotion; for others, bafflement and fierce avoidance.

For me, musicals have always been a source of enjoyment. I grew up watching The Sound of Music once a year, every year. I spent most of the last academic year reviewing Broadway tour productions for my college newspaper (best gig ever – great seats for the low, low price of 500 words). I’ve even been in a musical or two myself.

But not everybody is musical fan, and understandably so. Musicals can be just plain baffling. Why is everyone singing? Why does everyone just accept this? Real life isn’t actually like this! (As a person who sings throughout my day, I beg to differ, but the point stands.) Musicals aren’t exactly a 1:1 reflection of everyday life.

But some musicals do try to tackle the question of “why are we singing?”. Some musicals seem to take place in a world where everyone sings and spontaneous extravagant musical numbers go unquestioned. But some musicals have a group of people consistently baffled by the theatrical antics of the main characters, a mirror for the audience who are less than spellbound by this perfectly choreographed and harmonized world.

I’ve been thinking about these questions recently and the worlds that musicals create. Specifically, because I recently binge-watched the first season of the CW show Crazy Ex-Girlfriend (a musical comedy), I’ve been thinking about how these questions are addressed in musical television, both in shows that regularly feature musical numbers and ones for which musical numbers are a rarity.

Today, I’ll break down four of my favorite examples of musical TV and attempt to answer one question: do they know they’re singing?

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Laney Reviews: Harry Potter and the Cursed Child

So like many Harry Potter fans, I went out and bought my copy on Sunday and read through it all day yesterday. (I’ve specifically dropped in the “Read More” tag and hidden any spoilers so that if you haven’t read it, you get that magical first-time experience. If you have read it, I would LOVE to see a discussion in the comments! What did you think?)

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child by J.K. Rowling

My rating: 4 of 5 stars

Harry Potter and the Cursed Child (Harry Potter, #8)Like so many Harry Potter fans, I was in middle school (the same age as Harry) when my English teacher first recommended the Harry Potter series to me. The first three books had been published in the previous years, and the fourth was about to come out. My best friend and I devoured them and analyzed them, lovingly, but critically. (I still think of The Goblet of Fire in a completely different way that I do the others.) The Harry Potter books are not, in my opinion, great works of fiction, but they ARE a delightfully fresh world the likes of which others have tried to duplicate and none have arguably succeeded.I am not blinded to their faults by my love of what they represent.

What made/makes Harry Potter such a global phenomenon is that it tells a very human story in a setting that is equal parts fantastic and horrifying. We empathize with Harry and revile Voldemort. We feel the bonds of friendship that are set against the bonds of self-interest.

The other important thing to remember about the original 7 Harry Potter stories is that they are entirely told on the perspective of Harry Potter, a boy who knows nothing of the wizarding world and to whom (like his innocent reader) everything is a new delight. Harry Potter and the Cursed Child turns that original narrative structure completely on its head to create something entirely new.

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